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History Rebuilt Post 29 (1) - Agenda of Colonization By Europe (Economy)

We need to step back and look at several things about colonization by European countries. We will look at the reasons for colonization and the agenda behind the movement. We have said throughout our building of the truth about history wee have stated that every movement forward in history and every expansion and conflict was caused by the need to create wealth. So what was the condition of Europe at the time colonization started. If you truly don't understand this point just go back and review the detailed facts about each of the 13 colonies relationship with the British Crown. In reading the following, begin condition the mind to look for things that relate to our current day economy.


The century’s economic expansion owed much to powerful changes that were already under way by 1500. At that time, Europe comprised only between one-third and one-half the population it had possessed about 1300. The infamous Black Death of 1347–50 principally accounts for the huge losses, but plagues were recurrent, famines frequent, wars incessant, and social tensions high as the Middle Ages ended. The late medieval disasters radically transformed the structures of European society—the ways by which it produced food and goods, distributed income, organized its society and state, and looked at the world.


The huge human losses altered the old balances among the classical “factors of production”—labor, land, and capital. The fall in population forced up wages in the towns and depressed rents in the countryside, as the fewer workers remaining could command a higher “scarcity value.” In contrast, the costs of land and capital fell; both grew relatively more abundant and cheaper as human numbers shrank. Expensive labor and cheap land and capital encouraged “factor substitution,” the replacement of the costly factor (labor) by the cheaper ones (land and capital). This substitution of land and capital for labor can be seen, for example, in the widespread conversions of arable land to pastures; a few shepherds, supplied with capital (sheep) and extensive pastures, could generate a higher return than plow land, intensively farmed by many well-paid laborers.


Capital could also support the technology required to develop new tools, enabling laborers to work more productively. The late Middle Ages was accordingly a period of significant technological advances linked with high capital investment in labor-saving devices. The development of printing by movable metal type substituted an expensive machine, the press, for many human copyists. Gunpowder and firearms gave smaller armies greater fighting power. Changes in shipbuilding and in the development of navigational aids allowed bigger ships to sail with smaller crews over longer distances. By 1500 Europe achieved what it had never possessed before: a technological edge over all other civilizations. Europe was thus equipped for worldwide expansion.