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History Rebuilt Post 24 - Education on Britain Leading to Revolutionary War (Black Coat Regiment)

Updated: Jan 21

The following has been copied from https://nationalblackroberegiment.com/history-of-the-black-robe-regiment/.


We did not want to re-write what has been so eloquently already put together.


The Black Robed Regiment was the name that the British placed on the courageous and patriotic American clergy during the Founding Era (a backhanded reference to the black robes they wore). [1] Significantly, the British blamed the Black Regiment for American Independence, [2] and rightfully so, for modern historians have documented that:

There is not a right asserted in the Declaration of Independence which had not been discussed by the New England clergy before 1763. [3]


It is strange to today’s generation to think that the rights listed in the Declaration of Independence were nothing more than a listing of sermon topics that had been preached from the pulpit in the two decades leading up to the American Revolution, but such was the case.


But it was not just the British who saw the American pulpit as largely responsible for American independence and government, our own leaders agreed. For example, John Adams rejoiced that “the pulpits have thundered”[4] and specifically identified several ministers as being among the “characters the most conspicuous, the most ardent, and influential” in the “awakening and a revival of American principles and feelings” that led to American independence. [5]


Across subsequent generations, the great and positive influence of the Revolutionary clergy was faithfully reported. For example: